Book Talk – Bhoot Bhavish Bartaman by Mehool Parekh

IMG_20200125_160500-01The first thing that I noticed about Mehool Parekh’s Bhoot Bhavish Bartaman is its arresting cover – black and red is a combination I have always loved so maybe I am a tad biased. Inserting the lead’s name into the title and yet referring to the past, the present and the future is clever. I was intrigued by the title and was looking forward to a murder investigation and some excellent sleuthing.

The book is centred around Rupali who is murdered. The Mumbai police term it an open and shut case suspecting the help of having done it because he ran away with the valuables, but as is always the case there’s more to it than what meets the eye.

It opens in the present era but soon we are plunged into the 90s when mobile phones were just entering the Indian market. The book takes us inside Bombay dance bars when Madhuri Dixit’s Choli Ke Peeche was all the rage. Bombay is known as the city of dreams but here we go behind the scenes where it is sordid, and a city which rewards those who seize opportunities that come their way.

Initially, Rupali wanted to be an actress, then worked in a bank.We see Rupali’s journey to earn her own money and be the master of her own fate. Rupali’s cold blooded ambition endears herself to no one but her goal is not just survival but being successful, and we know it comes at a price, especially if you want it badly and quickly. Every man who met her, was enamoured with her and that became boring fast. Rupali is one of those women for whom power is the ultimate aphrodisiac. She lusts after money not people. Women to make a mark have to use everything in their arsenal. Of course we are talking about Rupali here – an unscrupulous woman! I admire the author for making a basically unlikable character the protagonist but her treatment still rankled. Maybe it was the male gaze that I had a problem with.

Mehool Parekh has recreated Bollywood of the 90s. We are led to believe the casting couch is ubiquitous which is a scary thought. We are shown how difficult it is to break into the Hindi film industry without a godfather. The author’s thinly veiled references to people in Bollywood by slightly tweaking their names is hilarious. Akhil kapoor is Anil Kapoor and there’s a reference to Madhuri calling her Madhu.

Our lead is Major Bartaman Bhowmick, a gruff unmarried army guy, who is afraid of cats. (In case you are wondering it’s called ailurophobia!)  He is fondly called Batty by his partner, Robin Chowdhury. She is a reporter with a good nose for unusual stories, and she is the one who smells something fishy in this open and shut case, and enlists the help of Bartaman. Continue reading “Book Talk – Bhoot Bhavish Bartaman by Mehool Parekh”

The Fault in Our Stars

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I was watching The Fault in Our Stars and I was amazed how it felt like a new film. Hearing the news of the Bollywood remake has sent me scurrying to the book. I don’t want to imagine the lead actors to see Augustus and Hazel in my mind’s eye. I wish I had never seen the pictures! How are they going to keep the humour and wryness intact in the film is what baffles me. One can only hope they don’t massacre it. When I watched it I did not know this was on the cards and had John Green not tweeted the news I would have shrugged it off as a rumour.

How did I miss the cameo of author John Green when I saw it on the big screen is equally astounding. Of course I remember the key points and see some differences (inevitable comparisons to the book) but four years later (it released in July 2014) I can somehow just enjoy what’s unfolding on screen and be at peace with it while racking my brain to remember the exact date I saw it first. (Found it! AfThank you Gmail for keeping a log of my memories, of tickets booked and the exact expenses.)

Instead of watching a recently released film (there are so many I want to watch) I stuck to an old favourite. Not exactly true, I know, if you have seen a film once but sometimes once is enough to know that you will be returning to it. I know the terrain for a film I have seen before and the comfort factor is of paramount importance when in pain. I know that pain demands to be felt but sometimes distractions help you survive so you may lose a few battles but win the war.

Like there’s comfort food, there’s comfort viewing because with something that is familiar I won’t be in for any nasty surprises and that’s all one needs to get through the day sometimes. For all the unpredictability packed into the day, you need something to hold on to. And it is a bonus when so much time has passed that the film is almost new. The Fault in Our Stars was like a breath of fresh air (pun intended) and I am looking forward to reading the book again. Okay? Okay.

Have you read The Fault in Our Stars or seen the film?