LGBT YA books by Indian authors

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Dutee Chand coming out as India’s first gay athlete inspired this post. And June is Pride Month after all. What is it about homosexuality that makes other people so uncomfortable, other than the obvious? Love is love, isn’t? But these barriers have been there since eternity in our society where any kind of difference from what is considered normal, is well, considered abnormal. Ask Oscar Wilde who penned the incrediblly moving De Profundis when in jail.  He dared to be himself (and loved the wrong man), and in stifling Victorian society that is an unforgivable sin.

Being a teenager is hard enough as it is, with conflicting emotions about the changes that are taking place in their bodies, and the formation of one’s identity yet craving to be accepted by peers. They could do without society breathing down their necks telling them they have to fit in or or hide who they are which is damaging to their psyche. It is essential to live your life on your terms and be who you are. Life is too short to go about feeling inadequate. If there was ever a time to be defiant this is the time, with the government deciding everything. Things are changing, I agree, but not fast enough, at least in the Indian context.

I have a soft spot for well written young adult literature (perhaps because growing up YA as a genre didnt really exist) and YA books written by Indian authors are still precious. Payal Dhar’s Slightly Burnt and Himanjali Sankar’s Talking of Muskaan are rare books in Indian YA pantheon which deal with the taboo subject of homosexuality in their own way. These books were written when Article 377 hadn’t been lifted. It makes them all the more important because they took a stand when taking a stand mattered.

These books are well written and engaging though very different in tone, texture and style. We have three narrators in Talking of Muskaan and it is comparitively darker compared to Slightly Burnt. The latter embraces homosexuality in a lighthearted way because of the themes it deals with no serious repercussions.  In both the books the worlds the authors have built for their characters feels real.

I love the way Payal Dhar writes having read and loved her books earlier. The effortless dialogue she conjures up is nothing short of magic; I could read a thousand pages in her prose. The behaviour between siblings (and close friends), squabbling but having each others back is entirely relatable.

These are a must read for confused teens and otherwise in the harmful suppressive environment we live where it’s a crime to be different. In fact I’d recommend parents read them to keep abreast of what could be plaguing their children. Article 377 has been lifted now but we still have a long way to go before the way society thinks changes and there are new legislations in place.  I read these books years ago. I suppose it’s time for a reread.
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